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“Why do the results of immigrant students depend so much on their country of origin and so little on their country of destination?”

Aleks points us to this article from 2011 by Julio Carabaña. Carabaña’s article has three parts. First is a methodological point that much can be learned from a cross-national study that has data at the level of individual students, as compared to the usual “various origins-one destination” design. Second is the empirical claim, based on […]

Roll Over Mercator: Awesome map shows the unreasonable effectiveness of mixture models

I’m not gonna link to all the great xkcd drawings cos if I did, I’d just be linking to xkcd every day, but today’s is just too good to pass by: He could’ve thrown in some Pacific islands and Scandinavia too, but it’s amazing in any case. The relevant statistical point here is how good […]

Election odds update (Biden still undervalued but not by so much)

Last week I wrote about the discrepancy between our election forecast and the betting odds: Suppose I were to lay $1000 on Biden right now. According to Betfair it seems that, if I win, I make a profit of $840. And our model gives Biden an 88% chance of winning. But we’re modeling Biden vs. […]

Stacking for Non-mixing Bayesian Computations: The Curse and Blessing of Multimodal Posteriors

Yuling, Aki, and I write: When working with multimodal Bayesian posterior distributions, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms can have difficulty moving between modes, and default variational or mode-based approximate inferences will understate posterior uncertainty. And, even if the most important modes can be found, it is difficult to evaluate their relative weights in the […]

Resolving confusions over that study of “Teacher Effects on Student Achievement and Height”

Someone pointed me to this article by Marianne Bitler, Sean Corcoran, Thurston Domina, and Emily Penner, “Teacher Effects on Student Achievement and Height: A Cautionary Tale,” which begins: Estimates of teacher “value-added” suggest teachers vary substantially in their ability to promote student learning. Prompted by this finding, many states and school districts have adopted value-added […]

Hey, this was an unusual media request

This popped up in the inbox: Hi Professor Gelman – my name is ** and I’m a journalist who reports on issues of ** conducted by **. Recently ** announced the department was working with “research groups” to study and analyze the **. To further my reporting on this issue, I am reaching out to […]

No, there is no “tension between getting it fast and getting it right”

When reading Retraction Watch, I came across this quote: “There is always a tension between getting it fast and getting it right,” said Dr. Marcia Angell, another former editor in chief of the New England Journal of Medicine. “I always favored getting it right. But in the current pandemic, that balance may have shifted too […]

Retraction of racial essentialist article that appeared in Psychological Science

Scene 1: It all started for me on 2 Jan when I received this email from Keith Donohue in Fargo, North Dakota: I am a longtime reader, and I am curious about your reaction to an (in press) journal article that I recently came across. . . . The paper is “Declines in Religiosity Predicted […]

Against overly restrictive definitions: No, I don’t think it helps to describe Bayes as “the analysis of subjective
 beliefs” (nor, for that matter, does it help to characterize the statements of Krugman or Mankiw as not being “economics”)

I get frustrated when people use overly restrictive definitions of something they don’t like. Here’s an example of an overly restrictive definition that got me thinking about all this. Larry Wasserman writes (as reported by Deborah Mayo): I wish people were clearer about what Bayes is/is not and what 
frequentist inference is/is not. Bayes is […]

“The Intellectuals and the Masses”

I just read “The Intellectuals and the Masses,” a book from 1992 by the literary critic and English professor John Carey. I really liked the book, and after finishing it I decided to get some further perspective by reading some reviews. I found two excellent reviews online, a negative review in the London Independent by […]

Do we really believe the Democrats have an 88% chance of winning the presidential election?

OK, enough about coronavirus. Time to talk about the election. Dhruv Madeka starts things off with this email: Someone just forwarded me your election model (with Elliott Morris and Merlin Heidemanns) for the Economist. I noticed Biden was already at 84%. I wrote a few years ago about how the time to election factors a […]

“Laplace’s Demon: A Seminar Series about Bayesian Machine Learning at Scale” and my answers to their questions

Here’s the description of the online seminar series: Machine learning is changing the world we live in at a break neck pace. From image recognition and generation, to the deployment of recommender systems, it seems to be breaking new ground constantly and influencing almost every aspect of our lives. In ths seminar series we ask […]

“Estimating the effects of non-pharmaceutical interventions on COVID-19 in Europe”

Seth Flaxman writes: Our work on non-pharmaceutical interventions in 11 European countries (originally Imperial report 13) is now published in Nature, Estimating the effects of non-pharmaceutical interventions on COVID-19 in Europe. Of note for your readers: 1) Nature has an open peer review process, so you can see the (pre-publication) peer review here. 2) Between […]

(Some) forecasting for COVID-19 has failed: a discussion of Taleb and Ioannidis et al.

Nassim Taleb points us to this pair of papers: On single point forecasts for fat tailed variables, by Nassim Taleb Forecasting for COVID-19 has failed, by John Ioannidis, Sally Cripps, and Martin Tanner The two articles agree in their mistrust of media-certified experts. Here’s Taleb: Both forecasters and their critics are wrong: At the onset […]

The point here is not the face masks; it’s the impossibility of assumption-free causal inference when the different treatments are entangled in this way.

Adam Pearce writers: When I read your Another Regression Discontinuity Disaster post last year, I was curious how much shifting the breakpoint would change the fit lines. A covid paper making the rounds this weekend used a similar technique so I hooked it up to an interactive widget that lets you tweak the start and […]

“Worthwhile content in PNAS”

Ben Bolker sends an email with the above subject line, a link to this article, and the following content: Experimental evidence that hummingbirds can see purple … researchers used Stan to analyze the data … The article in question is called “Wild hummingbirds discriminate nonspectral colors” and is by Mary Caswell Stoddard, Harold Eyster, Benedict […]

Am I missing something here? This estimate seems off by several orders of magnitude!

A reporter writes: I’m writing about a new preprint by doctors at Stanford University and UCLA on relative COVID-19 risk, in which they assert the risk is much less than most people might think. One author in an interview compared it to the risk of food poisoning. It’s a preprint so it’s obviously not fully […]

Surgisphere scandal: Lancet still doesn’t get it

So. I opened the newspaper today and saw this article by Roni Caryn Rabin, “Two Retractions Hurt Credibility of Peer Review.” It was about the Surgisphere scandal, which we’ve discussed a few times in this space, going from Doubts about that article claiming that hydroxychloroquine/chloroquine is killing people to How should those Lancet/Surgisphere/Harvard data have […]

How unpredictable is the 2020 election?

Our poll aggregation partially pools toward a “fundamentals”-based election forecast. Elliott Morris summarizes: What I did was create an index of economic growth over the past years using standardized percentages changes in 9 different variables (some of which you and Chris use in your LEI work). This gets combined with approval ratings, trial-heat polls and […]

Improving our election poll aggregation model

Luke Mansillo saw our election poll aggregation model and writes: I had a look at the Stan code and I wondered if the model that you, Merlin Heidemanns, and Elliott Morris were implementing was not really Drew Linzer’s model but really Simon Jackman’s model. I realise that Linzer published Dynamic Bayesian Forecasting of Presidential Elections […]